Weekend Open Critique Day #H14

Here it is Sunday again. It is time for you to show us what you have been working on. So put it out there and we will tell you our thoughts.

9 Responses to Weekend Open Critique Day #H14

  1. Here’s an anatomical outline for a drawing I’m working on. While I’ve started to draw the clothing and armor already, I’m not too far into it to be able to start over if any suggestions can be made to improve the anatomical outline. I already know that the left (our right) horn needs to be repositioned in order to make sense at that angle… Any other ideas for improvement? And yes, the “abs” are supposed to look like that.

    http://www.heromachine.com/wp-content/legacy/forum-image-uploads/jadebrain/2013/02/Parodeshi-Grendemoth-Outline.png

  2. I think it is pretty right on the way it is…intrigued to see the finished version.

  3. I would have the ear be behind the horn, not before it. Unless it protudes a lot while the horn goes way back, I can’t see how it can be this way.
    I may be wrong, I’m not very knowledgeable about animal head, but, well, it looks really strange and unnatural to me.

  4. Nick Hentschel

    It’s neat, it’s well-detailed, and the use of perspective is pretty solid. Just about the only “error” I can see is something strange about the ridge of the nose between the eyes: it seems to curve towards the viewer, instead of being seen in profile.

    I might also say that, for lack of a better description, it looks like the concept drawing for a really cool action figure. Something about the pose is a little stiff, with the arms and legs having the exact same shape, if viewed from different angles. So it looks like a molded figure a bit, like something out of MotU. ;-)

  5. @ Arioch: The ear does protrude, and the horn does go back. In that respect, it is correct the way it is.

    @ Nick: Actually, that first thing you mentioned has to do with the problem with the horn I mentioned in the first post. It’s not supposed to be a profile view; I think I was originally intending a profile view at first, but then I changed my mind and forgot to fix the horns to reflect that. In retrospect, however, I don’t remember why I decided against the profile view, so I’ll probably go back to it.

    As for the second thing, I’ve had trouble finding references for digitigrade humanoid legs, especially in the department of dynamic poses. Granted, there are no digitigrade humanoids in reality, so there’s no “correct” way to draw them, and a lot of artists who draw them end up stylizing the anatomy beyond what would be functional, so…

  6. Nick Hentschel

    It’s OK: it wasn’t really a “fault,” just an observation. Indeed, the “modular” way that you seem to be building the picture (drawing armor components separately, and then adding them on), is also very in keeping with that approach to design. I guess what I’m saying is, that you may have an aptitude for 3-D figure design that could prove to be worth pursuing.

  7. @ Nick: I’m not sure what you mean by “modular…” I draw the anatomical outline first, then tape another piece of paper on top of the anatomical outline so that it may serve as a reference when adding details such as clothes and equipment. Afterward, I usually separate the two drawings, then tape yet another piece of paper on to the latter drawing with the equipment to basically trace and add shading and texture.

  8. Nick Hentschel

    Jadebrain:
    @ Nick: I’m not sure what you mean by “modular…” I draw the anatomical outline first, then tape another piece of paper on top of the anatomical outline so that it may serve as a reference when adding details such as clothes and equipment. Afterward, I usually separate the two drawings, then tape yet another piece of paper on to the latter drawing with the equipment to basically trace and add shading and texture.

    That’s *exactly* what I meant.

  9. Jadebrain, you may want to check out relative differences in horns of species that batter vs. species that lock and push. It’s like that campy version of Jets vs. Sharks where the two rival gang leaders have their one hand tied to each other before a fight–only certain moves become possible and no ambushing.
    Battering horns are closer to or part of the upper head with minimal space, where lock-and-push horns can be as random and stylized as antlers. –This may be formative to the culture you want. Forming society can be putting away something animal or embracing it.

    eg. “The Hjluo were known for realizing their heritage, belonging to the noble species who fight by rules and not trickery. Strength and honor are the mark of the worthy. The Wras were also Palladian, abandoning their lower species’ behavior of ambush and trickery: they would collaborate as a community to build obstacle courses where combatants would compete in terms of agility.”