Reply To: G. W.'s New Superverse

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#150490
G. W.
G. W.
Participant

The Raven (no civilian name yet).

This is not the original Raven. The original Raven was an early eighteenth century French aristocrat who stole things out of boredom. He was a brilliant man, and invented a pair of wings and other gadgets to aid him in his robberies. He left France when he realized the nation was turning toward revolution, and because he had many enemies in France, and moved to England and then to the US under a fake identity so he couldn’t be followed by any of his enemies. His family was still wealthy.

Since then, the identity of the Raven has been passed down generation after generation to the previous Raven’s oldest child, or, if the child is not yet eighteen, the Raven’s oldest sibling, and from there I haven’t figured it out. Each Raven has done different things with the identity. Some have been straight-up thieves, some have become Robin Hood-like figures, and some weren’t even thieves.

This is the current Raven. He is a burglar and vigilante. Like most of the rest of his family, he steals out of boredom. As a vigilante, he battles criminals far worse than himself, with an emphasis on mob bosses. He is the primary foe of the Eagle, though the two alternate between being enemies and being strained allies.

The Raven has a snarky sense of humor, and is usually fairly laid back. His tools include the wings (again, not the original wings. Each Raven has either made their own wings or heavily modified those of the previous Raven), a sword which condenses into a ball, explosives, smoke bombs, and a device of his own invention that can easily open any door with a key hole to name but a few (he also uses standard thieving equipment such as crowbars, glass cutters, and rope). He also has a device he can use to call in his helicopter if the wings are damaged. Raven is also the head of a corporation founded by his great-grandfather in the late nineteenth century.

  • This reply was modified 6 months, 1 week ago by G. W. G. W..
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